Hoverboards, the most common name for two wheeled self-balancing scooters, made a big splash during the 2013 holiday season. A couple of years later, they were one of the hottest holiday gifts, but for all the wrong reasons. Cheaply made hoverboards often contained subpar batteries or badly designed chargers which caused several dangerous fires.

By 2016, hoverboards were becoming so associated with fire risks that recalls became common, multiple shipping ports in the UK blocked their import, and even Amazon.com, which will sell most anything, officially banned the sell of hoverboards for a time. The fires, recalls, and bans continued into the 2017 holiday season, but then things started to get better.

These days, hoverboards are again sold in stores and online. So what changed? According to one scooter and hoverboard manufacturer, hoverboards only started be accepted again once they started meeting Underwriters Laboratories UL 2272 standard. This series of tests sets safety standards for things like a hoverboard’s battery, charging system, internal wiring, and general durability.

It still took some time for hoverboard manufactures to get onboard. The UL 2272 standard was established in 2016 but fires and recalls were still surprisingly common even into late 2017, but after that, the recalls stopped. There were no reported hoverboard recalls in 2018 and so far have been none in 2019.

Does this mean that hoverboards are now safe purchases for the 2019 Christmas season from a fire hazard point of view? Yes. Or, at least, they are a much safer bet than they were just a few years ago. Still, even though compliance with the UL 2272 tests seem to be much more widespread, you do need to do you homework. For instance, don’t just rely on a badge on the packaging, be sure and do a check to make sure a hoverboard you are thinking of buying is actually certified.