soldiersIt seems only right that the men and women who have served in our armed forces should get the best medical care, but often that is not the case. We’ve all heard rumors and stories about long waits or poor standards of care for veterans, but one thing you may not have heard is that veterans have little recourse if a military doctor or hospital injures them as part of a procedure.

According to the military news website Task & Purpose, a 1950 Supreme Court ruling that was originally intended to shield doctors from lawsuits as they made life or death decisions on the battlefield has, over time, been applied to non-battlefield cases. At this point, the ruling essentially blocks veterans from suing for medical malpractice.

Fortunately, efforts are in the works to amend this situation. A bill has already been passed in the U.S. House of Representatives and is soon to be co-sponsored in the Senate by Florida Senator Rick Scott. The bill, named after Richard Stayskal, a green beret who is dying of lung cancer after he was misdiagnosed as having pneumonia by doctors at Fort Bragg, is said to change things by allowing veterans up to three years to sue after discovering a misdiagnosis or instance of medical malpractice.